Drugs-Forum  
Home Wiki Studies Forum Groups Blog Video Images News
Go Back   Drugs Forum > DRUG-FORUMS > Opiates & Opioids
Mark Forums Read
Register Tags

Notices

Opiates & Opioids Opiates & Opioids.

 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 14-06-2010, 07:12
MonarchX MonarchX is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: 01-06-2010
Male from United States
Posts: 79
MonarchX needs to UTFSE some more before posting.
Hard to urinate on opiates

It is hard for SWIM to urinate while on opiates. What can be done to reduce or eliminate that side effect?

Post Quality Evaluations:
This is a good question that can help a lot of those afflicted and confused.
  #2  
Old 14-06-2010, 11:01
pharmoc pharmoc is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 20-04-2010
Female from United States
Posts: 27
pharmoc is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 82, Level: 1 Points: 82, Level: 1 Points: 82, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Of course. That's the major thing swim noticed even upon first using opiates.
It gets to the point where it is so difficult for swim to pee, that she finds herself nodding off for hours on the toilet, trying to pee, and upon waking up, she realizes she still hasn't peed!
This happens because basically, the opiates put such a downer effect on swiy's body, that it causes it to almost become 'lazy'- making it difficult to pee, because the bladder is entirely too relaxed to simply and quickly preform the muscle movements required to pass urine.

Swim would assume there are solutions to this, however, she hasn't really experimented with any. The only method she has used, was running her fingers under cold water while sitting on the toilet. This works quite well but you have to be very patient, haha. Sometimes, she even flushes the toilet while still on it, because for some reason it increases the sensation to urinate- swim apologizes if that was too much information, lol. She also found that drinking tea specifically, helps her use the bathroom. As well as smoking a cigarette while she is attempting to pee. She has no idea why the cigarette thing works...
Also, swim is unsure of the OP's gender, however, swim is a female, and there could be different methods for males. However she can say, 150% that running your hands under cold water while on the toilet will help you pee if you are a male. She had a friend who was actually hospitalized, because he was doing such a large amount that he literally could not pee, no matter how hard he tried. The medical advice from the hospital, was to run his hands under cold water, or make a cold cup of water, and stick his fingers in it, until he starts feeling sensations to urinate.

Swim herself has never tried a diuretic, however, it would make sense that this would help swiy urinate. If for any reason you are unsure of what a diuretic is, it is something that can be picked up at the store, and it flushes out your system, by helping you pee. For instance, if one is bloated, a diuretic will flush out all that water weight, and, swim assumes, if it is capable of doing that, then it should be capable of encouraging urination while on opiates.

Swim apologizes if this comes to no use for swiy, however, if swiy is worried that difficulty urinating is uncommon, swim wants to stress that it's literally the most common side effect of opiates.. (in swims opinion) so don't worry.

She hopes this reply has been a help to swiy, and she apologizes for the length- but she hopes it was even the slightest bit worth reading!

goodluck & stay safe!

Post Quality Evaluations:
good information at all!
  #3  
Old 15-06-2010, 15:26
PrincessJo x PrincessJo x is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: 21-05-2010
Female from United Kingdom
Posts: 188
PrincessJo x is learning how to become a psychonaut.
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

The problem is the muscles are getting too relaxed, that's why you're finding it hard to urinate.

These are best tips/adivce Princess can give.

Option 1 - Try running your hands under cold water before going to the toilet.
Option 2 - Drink plenty of fluids.
Option 3 - Having a hot relaxing bath or a shower could help too.


Hope this helps!!

Princess x
  #4  
Old 15-06-2010, 23:27
Dude101 Dude101 is offline
Mercury Member
 
Join Date: 03-05-2009
Male from Canada
Posts: 124
Dude101 needs to post very carefully to avoid a ban by negative reputation.
Points: 4, Level: 1 Points: 4, Level: 1 Points: 4, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

It all depends on the dose. SWIM had a shower while on morphine and even still he couldnt go.

Go to bed and then wake up and you should be able to go.
  #5  
Old 17-06-2010, 04:53
Moving Pictures Moving Pictures is offline
Titanium Member
 
Join Date: 04-02-2010
25 y/o Male from USA - Kentucky
Posts: 2,908
Moving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond reputeMoving Pictures is a true resource and beyond repute
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Swim has this problem a lot! When he's on strong opiates (morphine, methadone, dilaudid) and especially high doses, he cannot pee. OMG! It drives him nuts. He took a bunch of morphine (at least 500 mg) over two days, and did not piss for two days!! He got scared. He was going to go to the hospital, but luckily, when he woke up on the third day and hadn't taken any since the afternoon before, he was able to go. It probably took 5 minutes to get it all out, especially with the starting and stopping. His bladder was so sore and felt like he had a blader infection for like a week (maybe he did?). The only way he went through this and didn't loose it was because he was loaded enough to either ignore the pain or just fall asleep at will. Swim doesn't know the exact dangers associated with going that long without peeing but it can't be safe.

Swim is a guy but he sits on the tolilet if he can't go. That helps a lot. He'll also turn on water (either the sink or the shower) and just try to relax. Thinking about it too much makes it a lot harder to go, at least for swim. If all this fails, DON'T take anymore opiates and just wait it out. Try as much as you feel like but you should be able to go after you get a nights sleep and wake up as the above poster said. Swim doesn't know how long is unsafe but if it's more than a day or so, it wouldn't hurt to call your doc or the hospital (NOT 911, LOL!). "911, what's your emergency?" "Uh, yeah, uh, I shoot abunch of dope and haven't pissed in like 2 days, what do I do?". Lol.

Swim's glad he found this thread. He didn't learn any new techniques, if you will, but it is good to know others go through the same thing. Swim has actually been thinking about creating this very thread ever since he joined.

Post Quality Evaluations:
Lol'd so hard at the "911, What's your emergency?"; mainly bcuz when I went for my piss test today, I couldnt piss! Guess what I dosed on prior to going downtown!!!
  #6  
Old 20-06-2010, 02:21
.:.Somnolence.:. .:.Somnolence.:. is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 04-06-2010
24 y/o Male from Earth
Posts: 96
.:.Somnolence.:. is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 166, Level: 2 Points: 166, Level: 2 Points: 166, Level: 2
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

ahh yes. This is common and is very annoying at times. All you can do is stand there, and wait until it "flows"
  #7  
Old 22-06-2010, 15:33
MatthewJ MatthewJ is offline
Account Awaiting Email Confirmation.
 
Join Date: 13-01-2009
Male from United Kingdom
Posts: 9
MatthewJ is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

The key is simply not to drink much when SWIY takes his or her opiate of choice. Then it's not a problem.

However, SWIM likes his Pod Tea and unless he does a long extraction or turns half the straw to CFO then he usually has a few unavoidable, unpleasant hours on a Sunday afternoon, waiting for the effects to wear off sufficiently.
  #8  
Old 22-06-2010, 15:55
DextroClonazyCodone DextroClonazyCodone is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 02-04-2010
26 y/o Male
Posts: 415
DextroClonazyCodone is a decent psychonaut.DextroClonazyCodone is a decent psychonaut.
Points: 317, Level: 2 Points: 317, Level: 2 Points: 317, Level: 2
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

SWIM is male and finds that peeing when sitting on the toilet is 10 times easier than while standing up if on opioids.

Post Quality Evaluations:
It's really easier for me SWIM as well.
  #9  
Old 24-06-2010, 16:41
.:.Somnolence.:. .:.Somnolence.:. is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 04-06-2010
24 y/o Male from Earth
Posts: 96
.:.Somnolence.:. is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 166, Level: 2 Points: 166, Level: 2 Points: 166, Level: 2
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Quote:
Originally Posted by DextroClonazyCodone View Post
SWIM is male and finds that peeing when sitting on the toilet is 10 times easier than while standing up if on opioids.
Ah, yeah man. Definitly good advice here.
  #10  
Old 24-06-2010, 16:56
Spucky Spucky is offline
Palladium Member
 
Join Date: 09-02-2009
Male from Japan
Posts: 2,415
Spucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline MedlineSpucky must mainline Medline
Points: 4,534, Level: 9 Points: 4,534, Level: 9 Points: 4,534, Level: 9
Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1%
AW: Hard to urinate on opiates

Quote:
Originally Posted by MonarchX View Post
It is hard for SWIM to urinate while on opiates. What can be done to reduce or eliminate that side effect?
Using less Opiates?



The Cat always guessed that Peeing on Opiates are more severe than on Opioids!
  #11  
Old 24-06-2010, 19:25
clottius clottius is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: 17-10-2008
Male from United States
Posts: 31
clottius is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 34, Level: 1 Points: 34, Level: 1 Points: 34, Level: 1
Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

I don't know if anyone has a droid for a phone, but there is an app called relax and sleep that works very well for swim. The app plays varying relaxing sounds ranging from gentle sounding river streams to wind chimes. It can play like ten different sounds at the same time, and for some reason the combination of sounds works much better than just the sound of the sink or the toilet.
  #12  
Old 27-06-2010, 05:59
bongkey bongkey is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 22-06-2010
26 y/o Male from United Kingdom
Posts: 26
bongkey is an unknown quantity at this point
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

SWIM finds urinating on opiates easy and frequent. But SWIM also drinks plenty of water everyday. Last night SWIM urinated 8 times. This was because SWIM was cold and had the window open at night.
  #13  
Old 30-10-2010, 19:58
TurkeyHill91 TurkeyHill91 is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: 25-12-2009
24 y/o Male from United States
Posts: 2
TurkeyHill91 is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 11, Level: 1 Points: 11, Level: 1 Points: 11, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

well my talking pet monkey Joseph has recently started going to the methadone clinic to get his life back on track. . He to has problems with urinating. Joseph has been going to the clinic for about two weeks, and since day one, he has had this problem. He told me he finds sitting down on the toilet helps alot. Even though Joey is a male, and feels sitting down on the toilet to pee is a little girly, he finds it works best. He informed that standing up usually takes too long, and is usually awkward in public bathrooms since it takes too long, sitting down usually takes a minute to get it flowing. He told me it works just about everytime, but usually flushes the toilet or turns on the water to get the sensation of urination. Hope this helps

To sum this paragraph up for the lazy: Sit down while trying to pee, flush the toilet or let the water run while doing so.

also, drink LOTS of WATER
  #14  
Old 30-10-2010, 22:19
Cazador817 Cazador817 is offline
Account Awaiting Email Confirmation.
 
Join Date: 30-06-2010
24 y/o Male from USA - Texas
Posts: 13
Cazador817 is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 25, Level: 1 Points: 25, Level: 1 Points: 25, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

run the sink while sitting on the toilet, and take your time. also, take note of how much you drink when you plan to use and try to keep it to a minimal and watch out for a lot of water or diuretics.
  #15  
Old 31-10-2010, 17:26
Xethious Xethious is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: 22-10-2010
Male from United States
Posts: 43
Xethious should urgently read the rules & received reputation comments.
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

The weird thing is...
An opiate addiction can also lead to bashful blatter syndrome(PARURESIS),even after quitting.
Suboxen I hear has the same effect.
Here is some information on the subject.
[QUOTE]Paruresis[QUOTE]

DISINHIBITORS
Drugs in this group include barbiturate sedatives, benzodiazepine anxiolytics, antidepressants, and alcohol. These substances act on the brain and central nervous system to produce sedation (barbiturates), relief of anxiety (anxiolytics, aka tranquilizers) or profound changes in brain function (antidepressants). Opiates such as codeine, morphine and heroin may also produce disinhibition but, as well as being dangerous, they are useless for paruresis because a physical side effect is they can cause urine retention. Alcohol produces sedation and anxiety reduction as well as other, more complicated effects.
  • Barbiturate sedatives
    Once the sleeping pills of choice, barbiturates now have very limited legitimate medical uses, mainly in the control of epilepsy and the induction of anesthesia.

    Trade names: Nembutal, Seconal
    Advantages: Barbiturates reduce inhibitions. One contributor claims they work reliably for his BB in a way similar to alcohol, but without the hangover.
    Disadvantages: Barbiturates are dangerous. They have high potential for addiction, with convulsions and risk of death in sudden unmanaged withdrawal. Even a minor overdose can depress the central nervous system to the point of coma and death. These drugs will show up on standard drug screening tests, so you must have a doctor's prescription if you intend to try them.
    Side effects: Coma, death, drowsiness, staggering, slurred speech.
  • Anxiolytics
    Otherwise known as tranquilizers, the anxiolytics belong to the benzodiazepine pharmaceutical family whose best-known example is Valium.

    Trade names: Xanax, Valium, Librium, Klonopin
    Advantages: Anxiolytics reduce anxiety, which may be a factor in paruresis.
    Disadvantages: Anxiolytics seem unlikely to reduce inhibition enough to allow those with severe paruresis to void. They may be helpful in less severe cases, but two contributors have mentioned that they seem to reduce the urge to void. As one wrote: "On Xanax, I am able to stand in front of any urinal and fall asleep. Can't pee, though." The anxiolytics may be habit-forming and require special care in order to wean oneself off of the drug.
    Side effects: Drowsiness, aggravated by simultaneous consumption of alcohol.
  • Sedative hypnotics
    In the same family as the benzodiazepines, sedative hypnotics are stronger. Some are short-acting. They are the modern sleeping pills of choice and are often used pre-operatively.

    Trade names: Rohypnol, Mogadon, Dormicum
    Advantages: One contributor believes hypnotics (Dormicum in particular) produce enough disinhibition and mental dissociation to be helpful for paruresis.
    Disadvantages: Hypnotics put you to sleep. Research suggests that short-acting benzodiazepines may be more habit-forming than the long-acting ones.
    Side effects: Drowsiness, confusion, amnesia.
  • Antidepressants
    The antidepressants cause profound and little-understood changes in brain chemistry. Their therapeutic benefits for depression are notoriously idiosyncratic: what works for one person may make another's condition worse. This is a complex subject which cannot be properly covered here. IPA has reports from a number of contributors who say antidepressants have helped their BB, particularly the SSRI class of these drugs. Others say they have not helped at all. If you are tempted by this route (particularly if you suffer from depression as well as BB) you should discuss all your options in depth with a doctor, preferably a good psychiatrist.

    The antidepressants fall into three categories:
    Tricyclic antidepressants: Divided into two subclasses, sedative and stimulant. Side-effects, particularly those involving the heart, can be serious.
    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors ("MAOIs" or "MAO inhibitors"): Dangerous, even lethal, especially in combination with other drugs and even certain foodstuffs. Antidepressants in this category are thought by one or two contributors to have helped their BB. Be aware, however, that these dangerous drugs to be used ONLY with active medical supervision. Some drugs in this class been clinically proven to reduce social anxiety for some people.
    Nardil is interesting though. It has been helpful for some social phobias, like test taking and public speaking and there are some mixed reports in the scientific literature with mixed claims concerning paruresis. There is one report that a related drug, moclobomide, a reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor (Nardil is not reversible) has been reported to help paruresis.
    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): Prozac is the most famous example. SSRIs function by interfering with the availability in the brain of a fundamental neurotransmitter, serotonin. They are all the rage these days and are thought to have fewer hazards and side-effects than the other antidepressants. However, the full list of side effects and contraindications for Prozac alone runs to 12 pages. Some SSRIs have been clinically proven to reduce social anxiety for some people. One SSRI that many people with paruresis report good results with is Paxil.

    Trade names: Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Lexapro, Celexa, Luvox (incomplete list)
    Advantages: Despite many possible side effects, most are minimal or can be addressed by changes in dosage or medication. For most people, SSRI's are not habit-forming. It is possible to stop using these drugs after a long-term dosage schedule, especially if treatment includes cognitive-behavior therapy, support group work, or other forms of self-help work.
    Disadvantages: Side effects can be significant for some people. Cost of long-term use can be significant. Some have a genetic makeup that renders these drugs ineffective. Getting off of the drug can be difficult.
    Side effects: Major ones include: suicidal thoughts or behavior, especially at the start of treatment or when dosage is changed; stomach or intestinal bleeding; an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); irregular heartbeat; low blood pressure (dizziness, weakness); high blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision); unusual bleeding or bruising; fever or chills; headache; tremor, nervousness, or anxiety; nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight; sleepiness or insomnia; sexual side effects. This is an incomplete list; check each drug's product insert for more information.
SSRIs must be used with caution in children and adolescents. Below is an example of the "black box" warning that appears on the Effexor XR product insert. Similar warnings appear on all SSRI's:
Suicidality in Children and Adolescents
Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior (suicidality) in short-term studies in children and adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Anyone considering the use of Effexor XR or any other antidepressant in a child or adolescent must balance this risk with the clinical need. Patients who are started on therapy should be observed closely for clinical worsening, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Families and caregivers should be advised of the need for close observation and communication with the prescriber. Effexor XR is not approved for use in pediatric patients. (See WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS, Pediatric Use.) Pooled analyses of short-term (4 to 16 weeks) placebo-controlled trials of 9 antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and others) in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), or other psychiatric disorders (a total of 24 trials involving over 4400 patients) have revealed a greater risk of adverse events representing suicidal thinking or behavior (suicidality) during the first few months of treatment in those receiving antidepressants. The average risk of such events in patients receiving antidepressants was 4%, twice the placebo risk of 2%. No suicides occurred in these trials.

For Prozac users in particular, hyponatremia (low sodium level) has been reported. A person with paruresis doing fluid loading for graduated exposure treatment needs to be particularly careful to include enough sodium in their fluid intake to avoid dangerously low sodium levels which could lead to a life-threatening condition.
  • Alcohol (not recommended, but included for completeness)
    Advantages: Several contributors say alcohol can reduce their inhibitions to the point that they are able to void in uncomfortable situations.
    Disadvantages: Alcohol is a diuretic, causing a greater rate of urine formation coupled with dehydration, which can be a danger for those sufferers whose avoidance behavior includes limiting fluid intake. While working on graduated exposure therapy, some people have had a beer during an exposure session to reduce inhibitions and increase urine production. If alcohol works for you, be sure to drink enough non-alcoholic liquid to avoid dehydration. It does not work for everyone.
    Side effects: You may be drunk after consuming enough alcohol to produce disinhibition. Any drug that produces intoxication is too risky for treating a chronic condition such as paruresis. Alcohol can be addictive, and indeed many people who have come to IPA seeking treatment have reported alcoholism in their history. It can damage major organs such as the liver and brain and, in high doses, can cause coma and death. Because of these risks, IPA does not recommend alcohol for treating paruresis.
    UROLOGICAL MEDICINES
  • Alpha-adrenergic blockers (Hytrin, Flomax)

    These drugs lower your blood pressure. They relax the smooth muscles of the prostate and bladder neck and may or may not help people with paruresis. They are commonly prescribed for BPH (benign prostatic hypertrophy)
    BPH is an enlargement of the prostate gland which may lead to a weak urine stream, a feeling you can't empty your bladder completely, a feeling of delay when you start, a need to urinate often, or a feeling you must urinate right away. Some physicians apparently mistake avoidant paruresis for BPH and insist on prescribing Hytrin or Flomax. For this reason, patients need to be aware the drug could be given to you based on an incomplete or incorrect diagnosis. Alpha blockers can cause a sudden drop in blood pressure after the first dose!
  • Bethanechol

    Bethanechol chloride is a parasympathetic nervous system stimulant. It's administered routinely for postoperative urine retention. Bethanechol is a drug which increases the contractility of the involuntary muscles in the bladder. It increases urgency. However, due to the nature of paruresis involving an inability to relax the urinary sphincter muscles, bethanechol may act on one part of the urinary system without doing anything about the other. At least two people have tried this medication without positive results. It may really be contraindicated for paruresis as it is contraindicated for patients with other forms of difficult voiding.
DRUGS TO AVOID
Most antihistamines are related to a class of drugs used for anesthesia or sedation. These drugs are anticholinergic* and can lead to urinary retention as a side effect.
Any noradrenergic** medicine (e.g., Effexor, maybe Wellbutrin, Strattera) as well as anticholinergic medicines (many of which are also noradrenergic, e.g., tricyclics such as imipramine, clomipramine, nortriptyline or anticholinergic meds used to treat stomach problems) can cause urinary hesitancy as a side effect.
In general, any drug listing urinary retention or hesitancy as a side effect should be used carefully or avoided if a person has paruresis.
*anticholinergic: opposing or blocking the physiological action of acetylcholine (a neurotransmitter)
**noradrenergic: liberating, activated by, or involving norepinephrine in the transmission of nerve impulses. Norepinephrine is both a neurotransmitter in the sympathetic nervous system and a precursor of epinephrine (adrenaline), a hormone released during the body's response to stress or fear.
HERBAL REMEDIES
Several herbal remedies purport to have effects on one's mood or the urinary system. While trying these remedies may provide positive results, IPA has not heard of any reports where they have been particularly helpful. Once again, these substances should be tried only at your own risk under the advice of a doctor. A common problem with herbal remedies is that the dosage isn't well controlled, so products from different manufacturers may have differing concentrations of the active substances. Concentrations may also vary between batches from the same manufacturer.
  • Kava-Kava
Kava-Kava is an extract of a root grown in Polynesia (Piper methysticum), that has relaxing properties. It can reduce anxiety and make a person feel mildly euphoric. However, this root also causes liver damage in people with a particular genetic makeup or with other conditions that affect the liver. In March 2002, the US Food and Drug Administration warned persons who have liver damage or who are taking medications that impair liver function to check with a doctor before taking kava-kava.
  • St. John's Wort
St. John's Wort comes from the plant Hypericum perforatum and is another herbal supplement that influences mood. There have been studies indicating it can relieve mild cases of depression or anxiety. See Linde, Klaus et al. "St John's wort for depression--an overview and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials." BMJ 1996;313:253-258 (3 August). Saw Palmetto
Saw Palmetto comes from the partially-dried fruit of the plant Serenoa repens, the American dwarf palm tree. It is commonly used to treat the symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, or enlarged prostate). There has been some reported use of it in treating chronic prostatitis as well, but no controlled clinical studies. See Di Silverio F, D'Eramo G, Lubrano C, Flammia GP, Sciarra A, Palma E, et al. "Evidence that Serenoa repens extract displays an antiestrogenic activity in prostatic tissue of benign prostatic hypertrophy patients." Eur Urol 1992;21:309-14.
I hope this Information helps someone out..
If It did, let me know so I can thank you for taking the time to read it.


Post Quality Evaluations:
Great information!

Last edited by Xethious; 31-10-2010 at 20:20. Reason: Spelling errors
  #16  
Old 01-11-2010, 07:27
Lady Codone Lady Codone is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 23-01-2009
Female from United States
Posts: 736
Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.Lady Codone must live here.
Points: 270, Level: 2 Points: 270, Level: 2 Points: 270, Level: 2
Activity: 0.4% Activity: 0.4% Activity: 0.4%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Pills like hydrocodone make it very hard for SWIM to pee (among other things). She finds caffeine very helpful both for peeing and going #2 on opiates. She still has to really concentrate to pee, but it happens. For some reason, poppy tea makes her pee MORE often than normal.
  #17  
Old 01-11-2010, 19:24
Pollen Pollen is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 12-10-2007
25 y/o Male from United States
Posts: 29
Pollen is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 21, Level: 1 Points: 21, Level: 1 Points: 21, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

My friend always drinks a lot of water on opiates for two reasons: being properly hydrated seems to increase the effect of the opiates for her, and also drinking a lot makes it easier to pee when she needs to.
  #18  
Old 08-11-2010, 03:40
FishTits FishTits is offline
Newbie
 
Join Date: 26-09-2010
28 y/o Male from Botswana
Posts: 119
FishTits should urgently read the rules & received reputation comments.
Points: 94, Level: 1 Points: 94, Level: 1 Points: 94, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Sometimes SWIM has to piss sitting down cuz it won't come out when hes standing. Its much easier pissing sitting down. Doing a number 2 on the other hand, SWIM has yet to find anything that can counteract the constipation opioids give him. When SWIM first started taking opioids, he was smoking H every second day and at the time he didn't know it caused constipation so he went to the hospital thinking that his stomach cramps were something serious, they gave him an x-ray and the doctor comes in and says "you're just constipated" lol.

FishTits added 2 Minutes and 12 Seconds later...

Obviously though, a diuretic should remedy this problem. SWIM recommends dandelion tea.

Last edited by FishTits; 08-11-2010 at 03:40. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
  #19  
Old 17-11-2010, 15:01
coolhandluke coolhandluke is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 18-12-2009
Male from United States
Posts: 1,530
coolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPACcoolhandluke must think in IUPAC
Points: 2,398, Level: 7 Points: 2,398, Level: 7 Points: 2,398, Level: 7
Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1% Activity: 0.1%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

this is a very common effect of opiates. happened to swim all the time. once he was afraid because he had drank about 8 to 10 beers and he still couldn't pee, so he stayed awake until he could pee.

he has a friend who will not be prescribed opiates of any kind because his urethral retention is so bad that he cannot take a piss for days. dude just tore an ACL and had to grit his teeth for the pain.

for swim the usual pee tricks would work. run the water, then run warm water over his finger, and as a last resort he would take a hot shower.
  #20  
Old 17-11-2010, 19:28
Rin_Weh Rin_Weh is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 02-11-2009
29 y/o Female from Canada
Posts: 433
Rin_Weh is captain of the psychonauts.Rin_Weh is captain of the psychonauts.Rin_Weh is captain of the psychonauts.
Points: 456, Level: 3 Points: 456, Level: 3 Points: 456, Level: 3
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Rinny hasn't done any opiates (yet) but she has had urinary retention from some other drugs.
She too has half fallen asleep on the toilet.
What Rinny does is make two fists (hard to explain) so the knuckled side of your fist can put pressure on your bladder. Message downward.You'll know what to do once you feel it.
Keep doing it, take a couple seconds break.
Sometimes then switching to messaging the intestines gets your body gurgling and then you go back to the bladder.
Start slow and then you can go fast.
It's frustrating because even though this does work, in Rinny's experience the first two times she think she's about to pee, it stops. The third time is usually the charm.
Also, visualize as you're doing it how it's moving through your body.It helps.

Sometimes if one is too high it takes longer so at that point, get up, do something else and go back to it.

I don;t know much about opiates but some drugs merely simulate a full bladder.
You feel like you're going to piss your pants but all you get is a trickle.
Anyhow,yep, drink water and I'd recommend the messaging techniques.
You don;t have to do everything I said because it's your body so you know how it will feel if you try this but it really does work, sometimes sooner than later. If one is real high, it could take awhile....but once that seal is broken and released...Holy Shit.

  #21  
Old 04-12-2010, 02:57
Naked Lunch Naked Lunch is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 15-03-2009
Male from Australia
Posts: 118
Naked Lunch is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 21, Level: 1 Points: 21, Level: 1 Points: 21, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

During swims many many heroin addiction swim always/quite often had problems taking a piss and would run the tap or some other source of watter to help go.
  #22  
Old 12-12-2010, 12:45
bjehsus bjehsus is offline
Silver Member
 
Join Date: 30-04-2010
23 y/o Male from United Kingdom
Posts: 25
bjehsus is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 44, Level: 1 Points: 44, Level: 1 Points: 44, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

Hold your breath to restrict oxygen to urinary sphincter muscles causing them to relax and you to urinate
  #23  
Old 22-12-2010, 17:56
Alex C Alex C is offline
Titanium Member
 
Join Date: 05-12-2009
28 y/o Male from Greece
Posts: 127
Alex C is captain of the psychonauts.Alex C is captain of the psychonauts.Alex C is captain of the psychonauts.
Points: 399, Level: 3 Points: 399, Level: 3 Points: 399, Level: 3
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

When my laboratory Panda finds itself into this unfortunate situation he has realized the following:

1. Even the male laboratory pets should pee sitting on the toilet. It helps for the specific subject of the thread, but also it has some more health benefits, like reducing possibilities for prostate cancer etc. Google-fu them.

2. When sitting in the toilet and waiting to pee, massage the groin area of your laboratory animal with cold water. Massage it in a downward direction.

3. Leave the tap water running so that the sound will 'inspire' your pet.

4. Tell your pet to imagine thunderstorms, rain, and its bladder getting empty. Visualization is a powerful tool.

This is the only advice I can give. I am so sad when I see my pet in such a situation. And, HEY, keep your pets hydrated (irrelevant, but welcomed advice)!

Last edited by Alex C; 22-12-2010 at 18:06.
  #24  
Old 22-12-2010, 18:09
bleach bleach is offline
Account Awaiting Email Confirmation.
 
Join Date: 21-12-2010
Male from United States
Posts: 21
bleach is an unknown quantity at this point
Points: 25, Level: 1 Points: 25, Level: 1 Points: 25, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

+1 for sitting on the toilet. even though its emasculating to pee like a girl, sometimes its impossible any other way.
  #25  
Old 22-12-2010, 18:52
TicksAndLeaches TicksAndLeaches is offline
Account Awaiting Email Confirmation.
 
Join Date: 13-03-2010
23 y/o Male from United States
Posts: 142
TicksAndLeaches is a decent psychonaut.
Re: Hard to urinate on opiates

This reminds my cat of his story when he had appendicitis. He had gone in because of severe stomach pain but the doctors needed a piss test before I could have surgery to test for reactions or some shit he forgets since the pain was so intense. Anyways to help the pain the nurse gave him 10mg hydrocodone and I believe 10-20mg or morphine IV'd, this was his first experience with opiates (has more experience since) but this made peeing impossible. Since he was opiate intolerant at the time he couldn't even stand so he had to take all of the effort he had in him to lean to the side and try to piss in a cup.

He remembers needing to piss so bad and the uncomfortable feeling accompanying but to no avail, for the next hour nothing till finally some leaking, very slow leaking, it took him another 45 minutes just to finally feel relief and give them an adequate sample. After the surgery was even worse because of not only the opiates but from having his abs cut through, almost had to let gravity do the work.

Share this on:

Tags
addiction, analgesic, antidepressants, anxiety, barbiturates, constipation, diuretic, drowsiness, drug, effexor, flushes, hypnotics, kava, kava kava, narcotic, neurotransmitter, noradrenergic, opiates, opioid, paruresis, prozac, sedation, sedative, ssris, st john's wort, urinary retention, valium

Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Side effects - Is it always this hard to sleep on opiates? justin77 Opiates & Opioids 55 18-03-2010 19:24

» New Threads
Slang Terms for Meth?
Last post by highlikeplanes
138 Replies, 36,024 Views
AM I GONNA DIE??? WHAT DID I DO...
Last post by highlikeplanes
7 Replies, 382 Views
Ways to hide/mask meth symptoms...
Last post by rawr161
47 Replies, 100,428 Views
$1,000 Each Hepatitis Pills In...
Last post by TheBigBadWolf
1 Replies, 2 Views
how long will 30mg of diazapam...
Last post by bobes
3 Replies, 130 Views
Coming off heroin using low dose...
Last post by EliteOps1
24 Replies, 615 Views
I tried MG seeds for the first...
Last post by Opiate lover27
1 Replies, 2 Views
MXE and extreme tolerance?
Last post by hookedonhelping
3 Replies, 58 Views
Homemade enema and cleaning the...
Last post by TheBigBadWolf
7 Replies, 209 Views
Molly or meth?
Last post by Opiate lover27
2 Replies, 106 Views
» New Wiki Articles
GHB
NET

Sitelinks: Information:

All times are GMT +1. The time now is 19:51.


Copyright: SIN Foundation 2003 - 2014, All rights reserved