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Psychological & social Psychological, social, mental health aspects of addiction & recovery.

 
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  #1  
Old 11-04-2012, 17:30
Zhekarius Zhekarius is offline
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Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

My friend has some pretty serious depression he's had to deal with, being bi polar II, since a lot of people struggling with addiction and withdrawal also have to struggle through this I thought I'd share some things that helps my friend to cope with his, some of these may seem obvious, but depression has a way of robbing you of the motivation for even the simplest of tasks.

Staying well fed - This may seem very obvious, but the opposite can quickly become true when you are feeling depressed, it is very important to stay on top of this one, and keep track of your eating habits to make sure you're getting the nutrients you need day to day

Finding a hobby that occupies your time - Again, not rocket science, by taking the time to find a constructive hobby you take away some of what feeds the depression to begin with, idleness, having too much free time to think can help fuel the depression with upsetting and self-loathing or guilty thoughts that may not even be founded.

Maintaining non invasive, routine exercise - exercise is never a bad thing in most cases, what do I mean by non invasive? Simple exercises like stretches, and tightening your abdominal muscles through briefly clenching them, holding, and releasing, in short, exercise that should be pretty manageable to anyone regardless of physical or mental state, these also not only help to distract your thoughts, but keep your body feeling better which will make a large impact on how you're feeling, remember, if your body is worn down, you, will be worn down eventually.

Keeping a support network of at least a few close friends and family you are close with - Having someone you can talk to in the flesh that knows you well can really be a make or break difference in your depression, someone willing to not only listen but that will try to offer you constructive words and advice and that is able to sympathize with the difficulty you are having should never be overlooked, as sometimes this can be more effective than a support group.

Joining a support group - If you find yourself either lacking in enough friends or family to create a close knit support network, finding one can be just as effective as well for many people, joining a support group that you can discuss the problem with with other, like minded individuals also suffering from similar situations and their experiences can help you to make considerations you may not have thought of alone or simply with a friend or family member.

Playing an instrument, singing, or listening to music - Music is with no question a wonderful therapeutic tool all in it's own right, dealing with symptoms of depression are no exception, playing an instrument, writing a song, singing, or even just taking some time to sit with some enjoyable music every day can have a strong and positive impact on your condition.

Venting, even if no one is there to hear it - Simply getting those feelings out in spoken words can have a positive effect on your mind, in a way it's allowing a little of a release, by getting those thoughts into formed words it helps the brain to sort them out better, and come to terms with these things a little more.

Write a story or keep a journal - writing is another excellent tool for fighting and staving off feelings of hopelessness and depression, keeping a journal in general tends to aid the entire cognitive thought process for most, keeping one during hard times only further proves to do this, and writing a story lets the creative juices flow and can be a wonderful outlet for emotions in general.

Paint something, or even just doodle - It doesn't have to be a work of art or the next Van Gogh, artistry and painting are another great way to channel emotions, including negative or painful ones in a positive way, which will in turn, help make those emotions easier to cope with.

Volunteer work- this can be rewarding in itself, it can be far more rewarding when depression is making you feel very low and worthless to other people, it is a great way to not only help your community but it helps to remind you you have inherent value like all people.

Get someone a gift, even if it's home made or just a card - giving someone a gift can make you yourself feel very good, helping others is programmed into our instincts, and when we do so our brain rewards us with good feelings, doing this while depressed is no exception.

Go for walks - This is separate from non-invasive exercise as the goal isn't so much to work your body but to clear your head, going for a walk can help greatly with easing the mind and aid in calming a person's thoughts, on a pleasant day it's also quite refreshing and a good way to gain an appreciation for nature in the right places, try taking a walk in the park or on a nature preserve trail.

Remind yourself : It can and it will get better - Sometimes more than anything all you really need is some reassurance that you're going to get through this, maybe from you yourself, or maybe from someone else, but re establishing this belief will most definitely improve symptoms as a whole.

(Added! Credit to Qualityplant) Meditation - There are many forms of this out there, and even if some of the more in depth meditation isn't for you simply just closing your eyes and focusing on your heart beating or your breathing can drastically improve anxiety and help to calm you, some meditative music doesn't hurt either.

I hope some of these coping skills are helpful to those of you also dealing with depression, be it from a drug or not as my friend has for so long, and wish you a speedy road to recovery.

Post Quality Evaluations:
Make this a sticky. It's perfect.
excellent suggestion through the whole post. I second the sticky idea
Great post. Lots of ideas to put into action
This is a great post, launches some excellent discussion.
These are really great suggestions. Thanks so much!
Thanks for posting this, well said and taken to heart.
excellent tips, especially liked the emphasis on social contact, excersize and meditation
Brilliant post. A real possitive tool for people who need sound advise.

Last edited by Zhekarius; 20-04-2012 at 05:38. Reason: added
  #2  
Old 11-04-2012, 18:57
DocBrock DocBrock is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

It isn't often something moves me to tears. In my initial years as a manic depressive; as we were known then, such an article would have saved me and so many of my family and peer group turmoil as they dealt with me. As someone who has been there, done that, got the T-shirt and keeps revisiting that vile resort, the below gets a huge thumbs up from me, and the author a hug. Whether they want a hug or not, they are going to get it.

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I echo the sentiments but rescinding posts is discouraged, as is quoting entires posts.
This is unnecessary and just disrupts the flow of the thread.

Last edited by Phenoxide; 29-12-2012 at 05:23. Reason: repetition of first post removed
  #3  
Old 11-04-2012, 19:07
Zhekarius Zhekarius is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

There is a saying I have about depression.. "If suicide is a hell worthy sin, depression is the demon that drags you there."

Even the simplest seeming tools can make a drastic difference for someone suffering from depression, it can become so easy to forget and lose sight of yourself, and neglect to take care of yourself as a result, and feel completely and utterly alone in your sadness and hopeless feelings. I have seen far too many instances of someone really, really needing help in my own life, and either not seeking it out or just not getting it and things ending in tragedy and pain for them and their families, and I want to do ANYTHING possible to prevent this same scenario taking place again, and harming the lives of other people and their loved ones.

I really do hope this will be of help to someone, as it was for my friend and still is.

Last edited by Zhekarius; 11-04-2012 at 19:22. Reason: adding.
  #4  
Old 11-04-2012, 20:30
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Great advice I agree with all of it and would add 'Meditation' in there too ideally learned at the 'Vipassana Course'

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a great contribution to this list
good contribution, but why is the Vipassana course the ideal way to learn?
  #5  
Old 11-04-2012, 20:36
Zhekarius Zhekarius is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qualityplant View Post
Great advice I agree with all of it and would add 'Meditation' in there too ideally learned at the 'Vipassana Course'
Ah meditation, that's one I had missed, my friend has never been terribly great with it, though he does it from time to time, it is indeed a wonderful way to pacify yourself, clear your mind, get back to the baseline, center your thoughts, and bring about a little more clarity to everything, thank you for adding this.

If people think of more wonderful and simple enough coping skills that can drastically improve and help to deal with the darkness that is depression, please do add them as it would be great to see more.

Last edited by Zhekarius; 20-04-2012 at 17:28. Reason: adding.
  #6  
Old 07-07-2012, 15:40
DJpajama DJpajama is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Great post Zhekarius. I second that emotion for Meditation. My favorite meditation style right now is QiGong and the 6 main healing sounds (breathing exercises). It's really helped me cope with depression.

Example: I like to focus on a breathing exercise for depression that corresponds to the lungs. I inhale bringing bright white light into my lungs and on the exhale I make a "ssss" that sounds like a hissing snake coming out of my lungs. During the exhale I think about all "grief, sadness, and depression" leaving my lungs. I repeat the exercise 6-9 times (either in a sitting or standing position). Then I smile at my lungs. )

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useful experience based reply
  #7  
Old 05-10-2012, 13:53
2long2tired 2long2tired is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

The depression/addiction cycle. I've been on this roller coaster for 30 years and just recently learned about the connection between the two. I try my best to subscribe to healthy diet, exercise, journaling (constantly). On that note...Writing to HEAL, I always knew it somehow but recently became aware that it is something thats been studies and practiced by professionals.

I'm 60 days off any hard stuff. My depression is pretty much in check, I even laugh on occasion. I was wondering though, if I feel like getting high, which happens regularly, does that mean I'm depressed? I truly think NO, likely sill withdrawl symptoms. No particular "drug of choice, I like them all!

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interesting point on writing to heal, more details please
  #8  
Old 22-10-2012, 09:35
Michele Lavigne Michele Lavigne is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

I used to tell people that depression is nothing but a loser's word to gain sympathy. But today seeing my son in the same shoes i am just speechless. I suffer seeing him. He eats less, sleeps less, has turned short tempered, cries over petty issues. My doc told me he is suffering from depression stage 2 and OCD. Apart from medication i am trying my hands on meditation to get him back. If anyone of you know something which could help, please let me know! it shall be a great favor.

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a humbling experience and a valid call for relevant information
  #9  
Old 22-10-2012, 14:02
King curious King curious is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

I'd like to suggest adding reading to the list. Reading allows us a sort of escape, but it also helps to give us perspective sometimes and to see things in a different way. Some books are also really funny and a good laugh can be really good for a person who is feeling down.

Also lately i've found that eating a piece of fruit helps to lift my mood. I don't know if anyone else has ever tried that. I'm not thinking eat in the traditional sense where all you do is chew and swallow. I'm thinking of taking the to savor the texture and the flavor of the fruit. Also the fact that I'm getting sugar in my blood from a healthy source reduces my worrying about the risk of things like diabetes and that helps to prevent that I fall into a depression.

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sound comment on nutrition
  #10  
Old 30-11-2012, 18:27
derpahderp derpahderp is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

I agree with king and like to add you can just walk outside your house and sit and read (for those with anxiety etc). Hell. Goto coffee place with wifi-- soak up the vitamind D.

It's good of the OP put this list up. Once youre motivated, it does set you in motion and is a usueful guide. Worked before, for me. Thanks again 0p for breaking it down in your own words.

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supportive and encouraging reply
  #11  
Old 01-12-2012, 04:43
Garrison Garrison is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michele Lavigne View Post
I used to tell people that depression is nothing but a loser's word to gain sympathy. But today seeing my son in the same shoes i am just speechless. I suffer seeing him. He eats less, sleeps less, has turned short tempered, cries over petty issues. My doc told me he is suffering from depression stage 2 and OCD. Apart from medication i am trying my hands on meditation to get him back. If anyone of you know something which could help, please let me know! it shall be a great favor.
Depression entered my world at 13 in seventh grade. My big mistake was trying to self medicate. I started with Alcohol and added cocaine, extacy, pot, nicotine, and other assorted chemicals to the list. IF I had known to find a good psychiatrist when my depression began I might not have put my body, mind, soul, and family through such hell for so long.

My best to you and your family -

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shows importance of seeking advice
  #12  
Old 13-12-2012, 22:04
toodarkpark toodarkpark is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

I absolutely agree with all of these pointers. My problem is, I read the list and still won't manage to get the depression under control.

It has been a few months of dark days, and no end in sight.

I need a trigger I guess, to alert me to the better days ahead.

I've got so many opportunities right now in my life that could potentially be very positive and rewarding, but I have no energy...no desire to even choke down a peice of bread.

No energy also means no excersise, and the self loathing that comes from all this idle behavior.

How do i JUMP START into a new state of mind when won't listen to what know needs to happen?

I know I'm not giving enough information for anyone to answer beyond vague responses but damn-it, I want to employ these changes I'm just at a loss right now.
Peace

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shows how hard it can be to find energy to cope
  #13  
Old 13-12-2012, 22:05
=Mescaline= =Mescaline= is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

I just smoke a bowl of weed, it actually helped med and now I am always a happy person.

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please expand, explaining how this process has helped
What works for you may harm others, don't be so blasé with your one line statements
  #14  
Old 13-12-2012, 23:32
Mindless Mindless is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
Originally Posted by toodarkpark View Post
I absolutely agree with all of these pointers. My problem is, I read the list and still won't manage to get the depression under control...How do i JUMP START into a new state of mind when won't listen to what know needs to happen?
I use many of the techniques described in this thread and have experienced episodes of depression for over 35 years. Sometimes I am too low to function, my favoured healthy responses such as cycling, contact with friends and meditation are not sustainable at times like this. What I have learned is that being patient helps, my periods of low mood always pass. I also enjoy periods where I'm just about as happy as any sane person can be!

Another thing I bear in mind is that its okay to ask others for help, especially when I feel as if I have no solutions or emotional resources left. I have found good counsel from a variety of sources, some official and others more informal. Mindfulness is another useful practice; I try to monitor my mindset and remind myself of some personal chains of thought, based on a particular philosophy that I find meaningful.

It's not necessary to come up with a plan involving several different approaches. When I find it hardest to cope doing just one constructive thing can make a big difference. One thing at a time, with no pressure to do more is an approach I find more viable. My own favourite is talking to a friend, or taking a neighbour's dog for a walk. For me social contact and caring relationships are the key.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michele Lavigne View Post
today seeing my son in the same shoes i am just speechless. I suffer seeing him. He eats less, sleeps less, has turned short tempered, cries over petty issues. My doc told me he is suffering from depression stage 2 and OCD. Apart from medication i am trying my hands on meditation to get him back. If anyone of you know something which could help, please let me know! it shall be a great favor.
Mindfulness training can be given, helping to deal with issues such as anxiety and depression. This training is also effective in Dialectical Behaviour Training, a specialist form of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.
Quote:
MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive behaviour therapy) is recommended by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK for the prevention of relapse in recurrent depression. It combines mindfulness techniques like meditation, breathing exercises and stretching with elements from cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) to help break the negative thought patterns that are characteristic of recurrent depression. Mindfulness is a potentially life-changing way to alter our feelings in positive ways, and an ever-expanding body of evidence shows that it really works.

Mindfulness exercises or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) are ways of paying attention to the present moment, using techniques like meditation, breathing and yoga. Mindfulness training helps us become more aware of our thoughts and feelings so that instead of being overwhelmed by them, we're better able to manage them.

Mindfulness meditation has been shown to affect how the brain works and even its structure. People undertaking mindfulness training have shown increased activity in the area of the brain associated with positive emotion – the pre-frontal cortex – which is generally less active in people who are depressed.
More than 100 studies have shown changes in brain wave activity during meditation and researchers have found that areas of the brain linked to emotional regulation are larger in people who have meditated regularly for five years. Research shows that Mindfulness can help with:
  • recurrent depression
  • anxiety disorders
  • addictive behaviour
  • stress
  • chronic pain
  • chronic fatigue syndrome
  • insomnia
  • plus more mental and physical problems.
Mental Health Foundation (UK). Mindfulness.

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Thank you - this is helpful to me just now.
Well said, and excellent of you to mention dialectical behavior therapy as it embodies the concept of mindfulness

Last edited by Mindless; 14-12-2012 at 00:11. Reason: new comment
  #15  
Old 14-12-2012, 03:02
BitterSweet BitterSweet is nu online
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Thank you for making a thread like this. Browsing this forum I feel like co-morbidity (having mental illness + addiction) is not so much apparent in the threads; we talk about recovery but sometimes not in a deep enough sense. There is of course focus on the depression and struggles that follow quitting an addiction. Then there is the issue of what is really causing what? After a while, the addiction encourages depression and the depression leads to more drug use. For me, I suffered from depression/mental illness long before I started drugs. I wish I had treated the depression as it may have left me better off and not tempted to self-medicate from drugs.

A great therapy source is DBT (Dialectical Behavioral Therapy) that I learned about while taking an outpatient program for people with mood disorders (borderline personality disorder). It focuses a lot on mindfulness, living in the moment, and there are many exercises available for each person to do when facing tough situations. The idea is to practice mindfulness, maybe starting at just even doing it for 1 minute, and keeping up with what is taught about mindfulness, so that when a large event happens to you, you are prepared. Some good exercises include imaging yourself on a beach - it can be anyway you want to imagine it; the water can be still and the sun can be out, or the water can be wavy and light showers happening, either way, then imagine clouds floating by, and in each of those clouds contains any negative thoughts you tell yourself, just anything that comes to mind, and the cloud floats away with these worries. You should try to sit and just not think, and try to let the thoughts come to you, but it is really hard, which is why it needs to be done as much as possible. What I like about DBT is that it is very different than CBT and in my opinion more beneficial in total; especially for those with mood disorders who can have rapid changes and flare up out of nowhere, which puts strain on many relationships in a person's life. Marsha Linehan is the person who created DBT, and she recently came out with having borderline personality disorder. She was labelled as hopeless when she was young because of her mental state, but mostly she was a victim of the mental health system that gave her a dozen different mental labels over the course of a few years.

Some good points from DBT are that life is worth living even if there is pain; everything is as it should be (i.e. life is not unfair or randomly causing you bad luck for no reason) and when experiencing some sort of emotional event you can either: do nothing and remain in the same emotional state; make a decision/try to change the situation; change how you feel about the situation; or accept the situation (which is different than doing nothing).

Apart from that, having a social network IS very, very important. We tend to isolate ourselves a lot, so when we are trying to get better, our previous connections are long lost and weak, so it is more than just reaching out to friends but even trying to get back in touch with them. With me, my old best friend has always responded to me when I've reached out to her, but there are so many periods where I recluse again and it becomes frustrating for her, so it is important to recognize that it is a two-way street with friendship. Although you need a lot of support, at the same time, commitments made to friends need to be kept too, or else it is all give from one side.

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very good points from DBT and also friendships.
some sound comments on co-morbidity, DBT & social contact

Last edited by BitterSweet; 16-12-2012 at 06:49. Reason: Spelling error
  #16  
Old 14-12-2012, 04:59
=Mescaline= =Mescaline= is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
Originally Posted by =Mescaline= View Post
I just smoke a bowl of weed, it actually helped med and now I am always a happy person.
Alright since you don't know much about marijuana I will be researching you and referring you to links so that I may "further expand this". I really didn't know this forum was this strict, but o'well.

Here is an effects list, it will show you why it helps with my depression "not yours" but mine.
POSITIVE
mood lift, euphoria
increased giggling and laughing
relaxation, stress reduction
creative, philosophical, abstract, or deep thinking : ideas flow more easily
increased appreciation or awareness of music; deeper connection to music; increased emotional impact of music
increased awareness of senses (taste, smell, touch, hearing, vision)
change in experience of muscle fatigue; pleasant body feel; increase in body/mind connection
pain relief (headaches, cramps)
reduced nausea, increased appetite (used medically for this)
boring tasks or entertainment can become more interesting or funny
NEUTRAL
general change in consciousness
increased appetite, snacky-ness
slowness (slow driving, talking)
change in vision, such as sharpened colors or lights
closed-eye visuals (somewhat uncommon)
tiredness, sleepiness, lethargy
stimulation, inability to sleep (less common)
blood-shot eyes (more common with certain varieties of cannabis and inexperienced users)
mouth dryness, sticky-mouth (varies with strain)
interruption of linear memory; difficulty following a train of thought
cheek, jaw, facial tension / numbness (less commonly reported)
racing thoughts (especially at high doses)
time sense altered (for example, cars seem like they are moving too fast); time dilation and compression are common at higher doses
NEGATIVE
nausea, especially in combination with alcohol, some pharmaceuticals, or other psychoactives
coughing, asthma, upper respiratory problems
difficulty with short-term memory during effects and during periods of frequent use (Ranganathan M, D'Souza DC, Psychopharmacology, 2006)
racing heart, agitation, feeling tense
mild to severe anxiety
panic attacks in sensitive users or with very high doses (oral use increases risk of getting too much)
headaches
dizziness, confusion
lightheadedness or fainting (in cases of lowered blood pressure)
paranoid & anxious thoughts more frequent
possible psychological dependence on cannabis
clumsiness, loss of coordination at high doses
can precipitate or exacerbate latent or existing mental disorders
HANGOVER / DAY(S) AFTER
dry mouth
tired, red, dry, or itchy eyes
joint stiffness
fatigue, drowsiness, foggy or slow thinking
reduced memory skills, slower speed of recall
WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS (after stopping heavy use)
mild to moderate, non-life-threatening withdrawal symptoms occur after daily use in some users.
Withdrawal symptoms normally last 2-4 days, up to six weeks with long term use. Severity of symptoms is related to frequency and duration of use and individual sensitivity.
anhedonia (reduced experience of pleasure)
headaches, general unease/discomfort
difficulty sleeping
desire to smoke cannabis
slight loss of appetite
finding non-stoned life a bit dull, increased boredom
fatigue, lethargy
slow thinking, talking
stoned-like abstract thinking, impatience with or annoyance at linear thinking


1 Q. What is Marijuana?

A. "Marijuana" refers to the dried leaves and flowers of the cannabis
plant [1], which contain the non-narcotic chemical THC at various
potencies. It is smoked or eaten to produce the feeling of being
"high." The different strains of this herb produce different sensual
effects, ranging from sedative to stimulant.

2 Q. Who Uses Marijuana?

A. There is no simple profile of a typical marijuana user. It has been
used for 1000s of years for medical, social, and religious reasons
and for relaxation [2]. Several of our Presidents [3] are believed
to have smoked it. One out of every five Americans say they have
tried it. And it is still popular among artists, writers, musicians,
activists, lawyers, inventors, working people, etc.

3 Q. How Long Have People Been Using Marijuana?

A. Marijuana has been used since ancient times [4]. While field hands
and working people have often smoked the raw plant, aristocrats
historically prefer hashish [5] made from the cured flowers of the
plant. It was not seen as a problem until a calculated disinformation
[sic] campaign was launched in the 1930s [6], and the first American
laws against using it were passed [7].

4 Q. Is Marijuana Addictive?

A. No, it is not [8]. Most users are moderate consumers who smoke it
socially to relax. We now know that 10% of our population have
"addictive personalities" and they are neither more nor less
likely to overindulge in cannabis than in anything else. On a
relative scale, marijuana is less habit forming than either sugar
or chocolate but more so than anchovies. Sociologists report a general
pattern of marijuana use that peaks in the early adult years, followed
by a period of levelling off and then a gradual reduction in use [9].

5 Q. Has Anyone Ever Died From Smoking Marijuana?

A. No; not one single case, not ever. THC is one of the few chemicals for
which there is no known toxic amount [10]. The federal agency NIDA says
that autopsies reveal that 75 people per year are high on marijuana
when they die: this does not mean that marijuana caused or was even a
factor in their deaths. The chart below compares the number of deaths
attributable to selected substances in a typical year:

Tobacco...............................340,000 - 395,000
Alcohol (excluding crime/accidents).............125,000+
Drug Overdose (prescription)............24,000 - 27,000
Drug Overdose (illegal)...................3,800 - 5,200
Marijuana......................................... ....0

*Source: U.S. Government Bureau of Mortality Statistics, 1987

6 Q. Does Marijuana Lead to Crime and/or Hard Drugs?

A. No [11]. The only crime most marijuana users commit is that they use
marijuana. And, while many people who abuse dangerous drugs also smoke
marijuana, the old "stepping stone" theory is now discredited, since
virtually all of them started out "using" legal drugs like sugar,
coffee, cigarettes, alcohol, etc.

7 Q. Does Marijuana Make People Violent?

A. No. In fact, Federal Bureau of Narcotics director Harry Anslinger once
told Congress just the opposite - that it leads to non-violence and
pacifism [12]. If he was telling the truth (which he and key federal
agencies have not often done regarding marijuana), then re-legalizing
marijuana should be considered as one way to curb violence in our
cities. The simple fact is that marijuana does not change your basic
personality. The government says that over 20 million Americans still
smoke it, probably including some of the nicest people you know.

8 Q. How Does Marijuana Affect Your Health?

A. Smoking anything is not healthy, but marijuana is less dangerous than
tobacco and people smoke less of it at a time. This health risk can
be avoided by eating the plant instead of smoking it [13], or can be
reduced by smoking smaller amounts of stronger marijuana. There is
no proof that marijuana causes serious health or sexual problems [14]
but, like alcohol, its use by children or adolescents is discouraged.
Cannabis is a medicinal herb that has hundreds of proven, valuable
theraputic uses - from stress reduction to glaucoma to asthma to
cancer therapy, etc. [15].

9 Q. What About All Those Scary Statistics and Studies?

A. Most were prepared as scare tactics for the government by Dr. Gabriel
Nahas, and were so biased and unscientific that Nahas was fired by
the National Institute of Health [16] and finally renounced his own
studies as meaningless [17]. For one experiment, he suffocated monkeys
for five minutes at a time, using proportionately more smoke than the
average user inhales in an entire lifetime [18]. The other studies
that claim sensational health risks are also suspect, since they lack
controls and produce results which cannot be replicated or
independently verified [19].

10 Q. What Can I Do About Marijuana?

A. No independent government panel that has studied marijuana has ever
recommended jail for users [20]. Concerned persons should therefore
ask their legislators to re-legalize and tax this plant, subject to
age limits and regulations similar to those on alcohol and tobacco.
Again, this is solely what I believe please don't rant about it.

Thank you Erowid for sharing this wonderful information.

Post Quality Evaluations:
you cannot assume this rating was made by one with no experience of cannabis. However, the first paragraph provides an explanation of the positive effects on your mood
Extremely hard to read at the beginning, and you don't offer much of where you obtained this information from except thanking Erowid - also, this is just copy and paste.
  #17  
Old 14-12-2012, 05:16
profesor profesor is offline
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Posts: 572
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
life is not unfair or randomly causing you bad luck for no reason
I am trying to respect your faith in this essentially religious belief, but I strongly disagree, and have some concerns that it might be counterproductive, at least in certain stages of therapy. While perhaps life may not ultimately be unfair; in the short term at least, life can be very unfair! It is normal to react and be upset or angry about random bad luck, the main idea is to express these emotions in a healthy way and not dwell or obsess on them.
Whatever type of therapy you want to try, get help from a credentialed professional. There are a lot of terrible mental health professionals, and a number of immoral ones too. As difficult as it may be when you're depressed, try to find someone who has a good reputation and is a good match for you personally. Sometimes you might come across a fantastic therapist who you will be unable to work with successfully for any number of reasons. If they're good they will not take it personally and may even help you find someone who is a better fit.
I, for one, don't see myself doing dialectical behavior therapy, but that's just me.

Last edited by profesor; 14-12-2012 at 05:27.
  #18  
Old 14-12-2012, 06:41
BitterSweet BitterSweet is nu online
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Well, I was just mentioning that it helped me. Also, I'm an atheist, an outspoken one at that. That line you quoted has no resemblance to anything religious, although it can help people who believe in god to recognize nothing is specifically singling them out in life to make their life crap. Life is unfair, but a person needs to get over the "why me?" and address the issue. It's like a state of denial; you need to get over it before you can move on.

If you walk around with a chip on your shoulder, that resentment is just gonna eat away at you, and it becomes more of a full time pity party. Life is unfair, but is there any reason to believe it should be fair? Life is just a bunch of stuff that happens - that's as simple and basic I can put it. So it is more like accepting that life doesn't need to be fair, and it isn't just a person having inherent bad luck. If you think we should walk around only crying about how life is unfair, I don't see how a person can make progress when something traumatic happens. Given it might take a while to accept this idea, but it should be a goal to get over any bitterness at the world or at whatever we believe to conduct the events in our lives. Being an atheist, this is pretty easy for me to accept. I don't believe in the supernatural, luck, intervening forces - if I did, it would be a lot harder. A lot of people have faith in god but faith is shaken after something bad happens to them that is not the result of their own actions.

Anyway, it is important to keep this thread focused. I have personal experience with DBT and have provided only the tip of the iceberg in terms of what one can expect from it. It was off the top of my head. It would be helpful perhaps if I got my DBT workbook out and posted something more professional as not to cause confusion.

Last edited by BitterSweet; 16-12-2012 at 06:48. Reason: Wanted to add more about the therapy of DBT
  #19  
Old 14-12-2012, 07:05
derpahderp derpahderp is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Qualityplant View Post
Great advice I agree with all of it and would add 'Meditation' in there too ideally learned at the 'Vipassana Course'
Yoga is an excercise one can use in terms of healing a body and mind. Depression sets in when we are not leading an active lifestyle(whether or not one chooses to run, gym, etc is up them).

Strengthening of ones core helps one with a meth addiction imho. When you're not doing anything active and just sitting there will lower your core-- hypothermia health risk factors to consider-- plus it helps to be active as it's well known to recover the addled mind (also contributed to depression).
  #20  
Old 17-02-2013, 03:06
out_there out_there is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

For those that feel meditation is helpful, and I definitely do, I have started a thread for people to develop some basics. For me the thought of meditation was unthinkable until I got some simple guidelines to start me off. Now i do it twice a day and it is so useful for those of us with psychological issues or drug issues or anyone really. Here is the link: http://www.drugs-forum.com/forum/sho...66#post1255566

Thanks for this thread and for opening up discussion into the deeper reasons that we suffer from mental illnesses seemingly more frequently in this new century.
  #21  
Old 26-03-2014, 07:47
Once.up.on.a.time Once.up.on.a.time is offline
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Re: Coping with depression (caused by drugs or otherwise)

So so true this is so helpful. Being depressed is hell on earth.

Often you can't see a way out and just knowing someone understands so much makes it more bearable

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